The AR7 – Packable Rifle for Survival

This could be called the era of the pack. In today’s world there are peppers who always keep a “bug-out bag” handy in their vehicle and at home in the event of a natural or man-made catastrophe. There is the wilderness survivalist who carefully selects items for his pack in the event he is lost or stranded in the wild. There is the backpacker who carries enough lightweight high-tech gear to camp comfortably in the backcountry for days at a time. And there are the wilderness travelers who travel by bush plane, canoe, boat, dog sled, snowmobile or ATV and carry a pack equipped for almost any emergency. 

One of the most popular firearms for many of these pack owners is a lightweight, takedown .22 rimfire rifle. The primary purpose for packing these rifles is for subsistence hunting for food in long term emergencies. However these same little rifles are also used for plinking and, in a pinch, protection. Since they are shoulder fired they are more accurate in most shooters hands than handguns when every shot counts. Also it is easy and lightweight to carry a good supply of .22LR ammo as 133 rounds weighs just one pound.

Read More

RANGE GEAR WE LIKE

Here on the Rural Sportsman shooting range we spend hours shooting and running through shooting drills. Most of this work involves the testing and evaluation of new firearms and ammunition. However, inadvertently, we test a lot of other gear as well. We find out quickly what shooting bench items, footwear, clothing, targets, etc. hold up under hard range use. Here are some of the items that have impressed us the last month or so.

Nexbelt

NexbeltThe Nexbelt, known as the “belt with no holes”, we have found is an excellent concealed carry belt as well as a causal wear belt off the range. It is unique in several ways. It is made from a high tech nylon webbing that is stiff enough to carry a loaded 1911 tight to the body all day comfortable. Part of this comfort is because of the belts ¼-inch increment adjustments. It comes in a 50-inch length. To fit it to your body correctly just add four inches to your normal waist size and take scissors and cut off the extra length. Hash marks with inches are printed on the inside of the belt. Take the cut end of the belt and secure it into the buckle. Where holes would be in other belts a line of hard plastic angled teeth are set ¼-inch apart inside the belt and when run through the belts buckle you stop at the desired tightness. It guarantees a secure and snug fit. To loosen or remove the belt the buckle has a small release that is pressed to free the teeth from the buckle ratchet.

Nexbelt

The Nexbelt that I am wearing is black with a black buckle but other colors are available as are leather belts and a Realtree Xtra camo belt for hunters. Cost of a belt such as mine is $49.99. To learn more go to www.nexbelt.com.

Read More

THE NEW 9MM RUGER SR1911

*Click small images for a larger view*

Now that there is an excellent selection of 9mm self-defense rounds on the market, gun manufacturers are developing some interesting pistols in this caliber. Among the most interesting are the new generation of 1911’s in 9mm. The past few weeks I have been range testing the 9mm Ruger SR1911 with a wide variety of ammunition and at various ranges. If you are not familiar with the pistol here are the specs:

  • Caliber: 9mm Luger
  • Slide material: Stainless steel
  • Capacity: 9+1 with the two supplied mags
  • Grip frame: Gray anodized aluminum
  • Barrel length: 4.25”
  • Slide Finish; Low-glare stainless
  • Overall length: 7.75”
  • Width: 1.34”
  • Height: 5.45”
  • Sights: Novak 3-dot
  • Weight: 29.3 oz.
  • MSRP: $979

Read More

SCOPED RIFLE SIGHT-IN MADE EASY

Sighting in a new scope on a rifle or slug shotgun can be an intimidating chore. You probably imagine yourself spending an afternoon at the range, shooting up a box of ammunition, and returning home with a sore shoulder.

Believe it or not, you could probably zero in your scope with just six shots or less.

The most frustrating part of sighting in a scope can be just getting your shots on paper. If you don’t know where your rifle is shooting, you don’t know what adjustments to make.

You can eliminate that aggravation by using a collimator or boresighter, an optical device that enables you to put your bore and scope in approximate alignment. Collimating your rifle in this way probably will not put your bullets in the bull’s-eye, but it will put your bullets on the paper.

Boresighters are available from several optics manufacturers, including Leupold, Bushnell, Cabela’s, Laserlyte, and Simmons generally in the $69 to $200 range.

Read More