THE SCOUTING GUIDE TO SURVIVAL

A Licensed Product of the Boy Scouts of America

More than 200 Essential Skills for Staying Warm, Building a Shelter, and Signaling for Help
J. Wayne Fears 

Prepared. For Life.®
In The Scouting Guide to Survival (November 6, 2018), current Scouts, Scout alumni, and readers interested in the outdoors are provided with time-tested advice on emergency preparedness. Some practical tips include: 

  • THE SCOUTING GUIDE TO SURVIVALHow to build a fire 
  • How to purify water 
  • How to signal for help 
  • How to build simple shelters
  • How to survive in different environments
  • How to practice survival first aid
  • And so much more!

Since 1910, the Boy Scouts of America has helped build the future leaders of this country by combining educational activities and lifelong values with fun. The BSA is committed to training youth in responsible citizenship, character development, and self-reliance through participation in a wide range of outdoor activities.

J. Wayne Fears grew up in the outdoors, as his father was a trapper. He earned the BSA rank of Eagle Scout at the age fourteen. As an adult scouter, he served for two years as the advisor to an Explorer Post that specialized in wilderness survival. He has taught wilderness survival to Boy Scout troops and BSA leaders and has served many years as a wilderness survival merit badge counselor. He received survival training both from the Army and Air Force. This is his third book on survival. He is one of America’s most prolific outdoor writers with thirty-four books and over 6200 magazine articles published. In 2012 he was inducted into the Legends of the Outdoors National Hall of Fame. He resides in Tater Knob, Alabama.

To request an excerpt or to arrange an interview with the author, please contact:
Ronnie Alvarado / (212) 643-6816 x 274 / valvarado@skyhorsepublishing.com

The Scouting Guide to Survival: More than 200 Essential Skills for 
Staying Warm, Building a Shelter, and Signaling for Help
by J. Wayne Fears
Skyhorse Publishing paperback, also available as an e-book | On Sale: November 6, 2018
ISBN 978-1-5107-3774-7| $16.99

NEW BOOK ON EVERYTHING YOU EVER WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT DUTCH OVEN COOKING

The Lodge Book of Dutch Oven Cooking By J. Wayne Fears

http://shop.lodgemfg.com/cookbooks-and-videos/dutch-oven-cookbook.asp

On April 29 and 30, 2017 during the National Cornbread Festival in South Pittsburg, Tennessee I will be at the Lodge Outlet Store autographing my new book The Lodge Book of Dutch Oven Cooking. With me will be members of the Tennessee Dutch Oven Society cooking some of the recipes from the book for you to sample. I would like to meet as many Dutch oven enthusiasts as possible those two days so put the date on your calendar.

A series of F4 tornados knocks out the electrical transmission lines, cell towers and local power lines in a five county area. For two weeks or more the area faces life without electricity and basic communications.

A small rouge nation has three “in place” radicals in the United States who rent small planes, fly to 15,000 feet above three preselected locations and each simultaneously set off small nuclear devices, an EMP attack. Everything electrical in the United States is fried. Within an instant we are living in the 1300’s.

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A&R KORSAR TACTICAL KNIFE

When I hear the term tactical knife I have come to expect to see a very large black knife with a blade designed for limited special use. This was what I was expecting when I had the opportunity to field test a Russian made A&R tactical knife, model Korsar. When the knife arrived I was very pleasantly surprised. The knife is very attractive as it has a highly polished blade, stainless heavy duty guard, stainless pommel and a handle made from Birch bark. 

A&R has been in the cutlery business for some 150 years and they are noted for making a wide variety of knives from a Russian high alloy stainless steel, called 95X18, which is considered by many blade smiths to be one of the best materials in making forged blades. This is the steel that is the heart of the fixed blade Korsar knife.

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REDISCOVER THE BAKER TENT

Base camp looked as inviting as a five star resort. We were fishing the headwaters of a Blue Ridge Mountains creek and each day we left the comfort of the tent camp to fight the tangles of brush to fish a little known rushing creek that offered fishing adventures few in today’s world know. At the end of each day of fishing we returned to our camp which consisted of a large baker-style tent located in a post card setting on a high hill overlooking the creek. The big white tent offered roomy sleeping comfort for two with room for gear storage. The front awning served as a protected area for cooking and simply lounging. Our campfire, the heart of the camp, was located just in front of the awning and it was there many fish were cooked; stories were told and on cool evenings a reflector fire was built to keep the interior of the tent warm. The camp would not have been the same with any other style tent; the almost forgotten baker tent was perfect for this trip, as it has been for countless other backcountry adventures.

The Name

If you want to start a heated campfire debate with a group of seasoned backcountry adventurers then offer an opinion as to when the first baker tent was used or where it got its name. I have seen shouting matches among friends that went on into the night when these subjects were debated.

Baker Tentsmiths Baker Tentsmiths[/caption]First about the name and how it came about. According to my research, the name “baker tent” was most likely given to the tent sometime back in the 1800’s. Many logging and survey camps back in those early days used the “Yankee baker oven”, reflector oven as it is called today, to cook meals for hungry work crews and since the tents they used had the same profile soon the tents were called “baker tents”. The name stuck and today most still call this style tent the baker tent.

Not everyone agrees with this as there are writings that state that the name “baker tent” came from World War I, where cooks and bakers used a large lean-to style tent to prepare meals for the troops. It is said that the troops came to call the tents “baker tents” as it was where much of the baking was done. I could not find any verification of that.

However even today the modified lean-to style tent is not called baker tent by everyone. Some campers refer to it as the “campfire tent” because it is ideal for building a fire at its front to reflect warmth into the tents interior. The same fire can be a pleasure to sit by after a full day afield and the same fire is convenient for cooking. The late, well known, wilderness canoe adventurer and writer Bill Mason used and wrote about the tent in his excellent book Song of the Paddle calling it the “campfire tent”. Because of that the tent still has a following that calls it the “campfire tent”. Since Mason made some modifications to the basic baker tent design you can find some references to the tent as the “Mason tent”.

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